The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part

2019

Action / Adventure / Animation / Comedy / Family / Fantasy / Musical

262
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 85%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 68%
IMDb Rating 6.6 10 49768

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
June 30, 2019 at 06:47 AM

Director

Cast

Elizabeth Banks as Wyldstyle / Lucy
Chris Pratt as Emmet Brickowski / Rex Dangervest
Alison Brie as Unikitty / Ultrakatty
Jason Momoa as Aquaman
3D.BLU 720p.BLU 1080p.BLU 720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1.71 GB
1920*800
Slovak 2.0
PG
23.976 fps
1 hr 47 min
P/S 8 / 20
906.21 MB
1280*534
English 2.0
PG
23.976 fps
1 hr 47 min
P/S 20 / 122
1.71 GB
1920*800
English 2.0
PG
23.976 fps
1 hr 47 min
P/S 7 / 123
897.24 MB
1280*534
English 2.0
PG
29.97 fps
1 hr 47 min
P/S 8 / 98
1.68 GB
1920*800
English 2.0
PG
29.97 fps
1 hr 47 min
P/S 16 / 123

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by dmshrmed 5 / 10

Something is wrong

I'm having trouble figuring out exactly what it is, but this film is severely lacking in something the first one mastered. Let's start with the easy stuff. There are way too many references and bad puns. Some reviewers would call these references "jokes the adults can understand", and while that is true, they aren't funny. They're just kind of there. They are references that exist for you to say "I get that". There is no "ha" preceding that. Yes, the original also had references and bad puns, but they were used well and there weren't nearly as many. The first LEGO movie was very self aware, but it had a soul that really seemed to care about what it was saying. The second LEGO movie was so self aware that it was very difficult to take seriously. There was an obvious message about how growing up should be about learning to work with different people, but it kind of fell flat beneath the veil of "play with others even if you don't like how they play". It honestly made me a little angry. Maybe it wasn't intentional, but the film seemed to suggest that traditionally masculine things are incapable of being imaginative. I couldn't help but feel a pinch of modern social politics biting for my throat. The first film felt very apolitical, and I believe that's fitting for a film about a franchise of toys that cradled our imaginations before we cared about politics. This film certainly didn't "ruin my childhood" by any means, but it was a disappointment.

Reviewed by thirtyfivestories 5 / 10

Everything is Less Awesome

Five years removed from the infectious first installment, comes a serviceable extension of a story that already had a proper ending. The subtitle The Second Part is surely a half truth considering how this narrative slapped together by the original writers Christopher Miller and Phil Lord seems tacked on in a "Oh let's take a victory lap then" sense. The new director Mike Mitchell is planted into a zero sum game as he tries to reignite the novelty of the first film while propelling a more mature plot that Miller and Lord insisted on being needlessly convoluted. This sequel comes off as a afterthought worthy to stand beside the other spinoff LEGO films, but lacks all of the magic of its predecessor.

The magic present in The LEGO Movie resides in the playful allegory of capitalism mixed with the earned nostalgia of the animation's medium. Not to mention the brilliant reveal of a child's imagination directing the entire story. These are all elements revisited the second time around, but the trick has already been explained by the magician. The world of Brickville goes through sufficient changes almost immediately once toddler-sized LEGO creations attack with unrivaled fury. The brick civilization reverts to a Mad Max world after the invincible fat-bricked organisms regularly search and destroy anything colorful or shiny.

Through some less-than-subtle live action mirage shots early in the film, its apparent that Finn (Jadon Sand) the boy mastermind in the first film is being plagued by his younger sister Bianca (Brooklynn Prince). Her entry-level LEGO creations clash with his more involved and complex structures, and the result is a sibling pair never learning to play in symbiosis. Of course this conflict is merely implied before the lazy live action finale that resolves the paper thin dispute, and wholly lacks the gusto of the first movie's twist. The jig is already up from scene one of the sequel, because we are aware of the children's narrative dictatorship, so none of the LEGO characters' sentience ever feels authentic.

Chris Pratt returns to voice Emmet a happy-go-lucky construction worker who retains a life of cheer in the apocalyptic wasteland. Elizabeth Banks also reprises her role as Lucy, the brawn and brains to Emmet's fumbling optimism. Lucy desperately attempts to calibrate Emmet's persona to something more appropriate to the ruined world they now live in, but he maintains the "everything is awesome" outlook that figures problematic in a much more adult environment. In a hardly tongue-in-cheek fashion, a character outright states the thesis of the movie to be "a statement on the waning affects of adolescence on imagination." This stands as the most egregious example of "meta exploitation," but several runner ups tail close behind.

Falling victim to exhausting cleverness, LEGO Movie 2 doesn't know when to edit its goofs. When you merely reformat the first film's plot to fit another child builder, new additions need to elevate the otherwise regurgitated formula. These additions include ramping up the meta meter to 11 and including two more banger tracks to hopefully burrow into the viewers' minds. The main attraction song here has a hook the repeats endlessly, "This song's gonna get stuck inside your head." Oh and I mustn't forget the cameos, which come with This is the End regularity, and if you can imagine, with far less originality.

I didn't waste your time by running you down a plot synopsis for good reason. The film plays with your expectations in a cheap and unearned fashion without offering any reasonable explanation upon the conclusion other than, "We just wanted to plant red herrings, because...reasons." Screenwriters will go to great (and absurd) lengths to make an unoriginal script appear more interesting. This parasitic sequel will deliver many chuckles and feels to audiences that have already surrendered to the committee-made trajectory of the LEGO universe, but I feel somber for those choosing to double feature this lackadaisical copy with its bold predecessor.

Reviewed by wesbdavis 9 / 10

Another clever, heartwarming 90-minute toy commercial

I was sceptical that a sequel to The LEGO Movie could be pulled off, given that movie's twists and turns in the final act. But Lord & Miller's script pulls it off again. It doesn't have the same surprise, but it retains the heart and love of the product that makes it go beyond a "toy commercial" in to a true heartwarming, entertaining, and most of all, funny movie with a great theme embedded in it. It doesn't quite reach the heights of the predecessor, but it comes so very, very close. It'll be hard not to find something or someone to love in this movie.

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